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Big Daddy Weave - 'What I Was Made For'

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Big Daddy Weave - What I Was Made For

Big Daddy Weave - What I Was Made For

Fervent Records

The Bottom Line

Big Daddy Weave's What I Was Made For is more guitar-driven, more rock-n-roll, but Weaver's distinctive vocals and the full instrumentation are instantly and joyfully recognizable.

Pros

  • More of the BDW unique sound we've come to love
  • High energy tunes with lots of enthusiasm

Cons

  • More rock than earlier CDs, not necessarily a bad thing

Description

  • Style: Pop rock
  • 11 songs, 10 new and David Ruis' "You're Worthy of my Praise"
  • Release Date: July 26, 2005

Guide Review - Big Daddy Weave - 'What I Was Made For'

Big Daddy Weave always brought a heartfelt zeal to their projects, and What I Was Made For is no different. The solid sincerity of their worship comes through on every song with a new strength, strength of "hurricane" proportions. Lead vocalist Mike Weaver reports that Hurricane Ivan made quite an impression on the band members, tearing through the Weaver's family home and the band's home office in Mobile, AL. This circumstance challenged the band members to dig deep into their trust reservoirs. What I Was Made For is the happy result, making for some soul-searching lyrics that ring with truth.

The classic "You're Worthy of My Praise", performed with BarlowGirl, is already heating up the airwaves. I can't say that I was overly thrilled by it, but I'm not a big fan of covers. I'm much more drawn to new material and BDW does not disappoint in this area.

I can't rave enough about "Without You", a mellow song reeking of devotion. It is stunningly well done. "Killing Me Again", featuring Fred Hammond, is a powerful message-driven song about addiction that in a perfect world I'd love to see featured with morning announcements in every high school. But I'm a big dreamer. Don't miss "It's All About You," a simple yet commanding anthem (love that organ!) The last track is a tricky one, "Quiet Time", 5 minutes of silence. That's right, no song. Weaver's notes say: "If you have time to listen to this record, then here's five minutes to spend with God." Ya gotta love these guys.

Disclosure: A review copy was provided by the publisher. For more information, please see our Ethics Policy.

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